Light Bulb Moments: Impact and Expansion in Early Arts Learning

Have you ever heard an autistic, mute, 4-year old speak for the very first time? Neither have I, but our Wolf Trap Teaching Artists frequently work these miracles in Pre-K classrooms. So what’s the secret? How do these light bulb moments happen for children of diverse backgrounds? The answer is simple: arts-infused learning.

Let me first explain the wonders of Wolf Trap Institute for Early Learning through the Arts. The Arts & Science Council is a state affiliate that administers a program developed by the “mothership” up in Vienna, Virginia. The program places professional teaching artists in partnership with classroom teachers in Pre-K and Kindergarten classrooms for 7-week arts residencies. The professional development program gives these classroom teachers performing arts skills that help to ignite creativity in their students and spark an interest in learning – the fun way.

I’ve had the great pleasure of witnessing the joy, smiles, and authentic excitement for learning that this program awakens within Pre-K students. A typical classroom in CMS can include many non-English speaking students, students with a range of learning disabilities, and students that are living at or below the poverty line. Wolf Trap uses the arts to create a more equitable learning environment for these students.

This program is not a flouncy add-on to what teachers must accomplish in a school year. No, Wolf Trap uses the arts as a vehicle to enhance the literacy, math, or science learning that’s already taking place. Take, for example, a math residency in music. Did you know that a young person’s memory span can only handle seven items of information at a time? Defying these limitations, music works to string together three or four times the amount of information by using a melody that is much more easily recalled. In the case of a Pre-K math lesson, students learn songs about shapes that are easily recalled because the information is attached to a catchy tune.

North Carolina Wolf Trap is rapidly expanding and bringing more educational equity to students and schools across the state. What once was a one-county residency program ten years ago now has the capacity to offer over 85 residencies in five counties. The ESL (English as a Second Language) and LSES (Low Socioeconomic Status) students in classrooms with Wolf Trap now have a more equal opportunity to be successful in school due to the solid foundations Wolf Trap lessons provide. These arts residencies allow more students to read on reading level by the time they get to third grade.

Did you know that the number of newly constructed prison cells each year is based on the number of students that cannot read in third grade? Let that ruminate in your brain for a moment….

I feel exceptionally lucky to work at a place like ASC that prioritizes programs that move the dial on important issues in our education system.

Understanding trauma and resilience through research, real stories and reality… my reality

I’m sure you are all well aware that social factors affect health. This framework was not unfamiliar to me when I first started working at Mountain Area Health Education Center (MAHEC). I understood that social experiences can influence health, but I didn’t realize to what extent until I began a research project at MAHEC on […]

Continue reading...

How to balance numbers with people: losing sight of the cause

Living in Mwanza, Tanzania as an expat is like being in freshman year of college again except with slightly different questions. Instead of “what dorm do you live in?” and “what is your hometown?”, people continuously ask “how long have you been here?”, “which country are you from?” (although my very obvious American accent answers […]

Continue reading...

Dirty Jobs: Land Conservation and Environmental Management

My time at Catawba Lands Conservancy and Carolina Thread Trail has been split in many different directions, doing many different types of work, and working with all types of people. You can really learn a lot about the society we live in behind stands of pines and hardwoods, in the riparian lands along our creeks […]

Continue reading...

Introduction to Non-Profit Environmental Conservation Efforts in a Diverse and Developing Region

I am currently working for Catawba Lands Conservancy and Carolina Thread Trail in Charlotte, NC. Catawba Lands Conservancy (CLC) is a local not-for-profit land trust dedicated to preserving land to protect water quality, wildlife habitat, and farmland. The final tier to the Conservancy’s mission is to connect lives to nature in the Charlotte region, and […]

Continue reading...

Building Trust Through the Creation of Conflict

Recently, I had the opportunity to participate in an exciting exercise designed to build trust. Using items I found around the office, I created an obstacle course that teams had to guide a blindfolded team member through. Many people have probably participated in this activity, or one very similar to it, on a retreat or […]

Continue reading...

Simple, but Powerful Medicines: Patience, Listening and Trust

By the end of my time at Davidson, I had become so accustomed to immediate results. After a long evening session in the library, elegant graphs, lengthy Spanish sentences, and even chapters of my thesis would appear before my eyes. It was so satisfying to see my ideas and efforts rapidly crystallize into a tangible […]

Continue reading...

Pictionary in Tanzania: Bridging Cultural Gaps at the Touch Foundation

I am a Program Analyst at Touch Foundation in Mwanza, Tanzania. Over my time at Touch the program team has consisted of 2 Australians, 1 Bulgarian, 2 South Africans, 1 American, 1 French person, 4 Tanzanians and 2 Italians. Not only is there a variety of nationalities but religious backgrounds, professional backgrounds, and socio-economic statuses […]

Continue reading...

Fighting Hunger with the Hispanic Diocese of St. Petersburg, Florida by Amy Lamb

Florida has changed and grown since my childhood, but nothing is more normal there than a severe–but short–thunderstorm in the afternoon. I wasn’t surprised when, during a recent Helping Hands meal packaging event with the Hispanic Diocese of St. Petersburg, Florida, the lights flickered and the salsa, merengue or bachata-influenced music stopped for a moment. […]

Continue reading...

Waiting for the Weekdays: 2016 in Review

Growing up, I often heard the expression working for the weekends. As a student, I more than understood what this phrase meant. The week was tough while the weekend was fun. However, my experience with Communities In Schools (CIS) has caused me to rethink this commonly heard saying. Why wait for the weekends, when weekdays […]

Continue reading...
css.php