Archives for March 2015

Matching Idealism with Pragmatism: Working towards a Healthier Tanzania

Over 7,000 miles away from Tanzania’s Lake Zone is a different sort of jungle—New York City. While Touch’s in-country team executes and manages our projects in East Africa, I support the development, implementation, and evaluation of the organization’s communication plan from Touch’s New York office. Established in 2004, the Touch Foundation works to improve Tanzania’s quality and quantity of healthcare workers, optimize their deployment and retention, and enhance the healthcare delivery mechanisms in which they work.

I worked with a lot of nonprofits during my four years at Davidson. What drew me to Touch was its commitment to sustainable impact and emphasis on local collaboration and ownership. Our projects are designed from careful needs-based analyses and executed with the expectation that Touch will eventually transition them to Tanzanian management, empowering our Tanzanian partners and ensuring the vitality of Touch’s work. Touch embodies a sense of idealism matched with a pragmatism that channeled the many Exit 30 discussions had on effective service and international development. This isn’t entirely coincidental as a fellow Wildcat, Lowell L. Bryan ‘68, founded and leads Touch as its president. This now a warrants a shout-out to Dr. Steve Justus ‘78, Touch’s Chief Medical Officer and Senior Vice President and Hannah English ’12, Touch’s Development Manager. Adjusting to post-grad/city life wasn’t too bad as you can now see.

Working from New York has also enabled me to obtain a greater grasp at nonprofit development, i.e., the fundraising elements of nonprofits. It certainly spans far beyond throwing annual galas and generating appeals. Development is a giant undertaking an an integral component of a nonprofit organization. It encompasses donor management to ensuring funds are raised, responsibly spent, tracked, and reported. What repeatedly overwhelms me most about the process is learning how many organizations there are working on healthcare in Africa. What makes Touch worthy of donor contributions among the tens of dozens of organizations doing great work?

But then I step back. I think about our approach. It’s a single country focus and while not as “sexy” as rolling out a map with project dots emblazoned across four continents, it’s what makes Touch effective. International development takes time. There are relationships to build and success is contingent upon a community’s specific dynamics and institutions in place. We’re here for the long-term and when we leave it’s because Tanzania is ready for us to leave. Such realizations make me even more proud to be part of such a dedicated and reflective team.

I know this will increasingly be the case when I experience and contribute to our on-the-ground work firsthand–and it looks like this will happen sooner than later. Vaccination appointments set and flights are booked! Just in time to escape New York’s painfully cold weather too.

A Touch of Program

Participants of third annual Cutler Fellows Program

2015 Cutler Fellows, Faculty and Staff gather for a group photo in the United States Institute of Peace atrium.

Over the course of my Fellowship with Salzburg Global Seminar, I have focused the majority of my time in fundraising. Juggling the many projects in support of both institutional and individual giving for Salzburg Global keeps me busy, to say the least. Solicitations, grant proposals and reports are constantly circulating among the members of our team. We are always looking ahead to what is next on our fundraising plates and rarely do we have the time to stop and reflect about the end product – yes, the actual seminars.  So, witnessing the development team’s fundraising efforts come to fruition in successful, dynamic programs has been one of the most rewarding parts of my Davidson Impact Fellowship – first through the Young Cultural Innovators Forum in Salzburg and, more recently, in the third annual Salzburg Cutler Law Fellows Program in Washington D.C.

Just a couple of weeks ago, the Cutler Salzburg Fellows Program brought together 45 law students from the ten of the top American law schools; University of Chicago, Columbia, Duke University, Georgetown University, Harvard, New York University, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford, University of Virginia, and Yale. This two-day session was built around a unique workshop opportunity for students writing papers on topics within international law and legal practice. Students circulated their papers among their working groups and Faculty members before arriving in Washington. The program provided a platform for every student to receive approximately 30 minutes of critique on his or her paper from a group of individuals with fresh eyes and ideas.

I served as the photographer for Cutler Fellows program, floating between the workshop groups to capture snapshots of new interactions and lively discussions. I also attended the lectures and panels dispersed throughout the program from law school Faculty and other leaders in international law, including John Bellinger III (former Legal Advisor to the US Department of State and National Security Council under the George W. Bush administration),  Jeffrey Rosen (President and CEO, National Constitution Center) and The Honorable Justice Richard Goldstone (former Chief Prosecutor to the UN International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda). The students seemed excited to network with each other and engage with the program’s special guests. Seeing the program from start to finish was not only a nice break from the typical day in the office but also a nice reminder for why I do the work I do with Salzburg Global.

Faculty Panel from Cutler Fellows Program

International Investment & Trade Negotiations panel with law school faculty members Rachel Brewster (Duke), moderator William Burke-White (University of Pennsylvania), Mark Wu (Harvard) and Jose Alvarez (NYU).

Cutler Fellows in working groups

Cutler Fellows discuss their own papers in break-out groups. Each paper received an estimated 30 minutes of critique from students and faculty of other law schools.

Justice Richard Goldstone

The Honorable Justice Richard Goldstone speaks on ‘Personal Reflections on Law and Public Service’ at NYU Washington DC.

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